Batteries
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Bosch associate
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Hiya

These competitors may offer a 3 year warranty but this doesn't necessarily indicate their tools are more reliable will last longer. It simply means they offer a longer warranty.

I can't comment on China but here in the UK we are also in the process of replacing all our 3.0 ah batteries with 4.0 ah with no noticeable weight increase. We are introducing this with new products in Q4 and phasing out the 3.0 ah batteries with older products.

I know I work for Bosch but I think there is alot more to our tools than just capacity and a decision should be made on more than simply battery a.h.

And yes the GBH 18 is pretty sweet. :)

Bob


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Servicing / Maintenance
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Hi,
To pick up on the battery issue for 36v I would suggest looking at the makita system where they use 2 x 18v batteries combined to run a 36v tool.
This makes great sense in that your are most likely to be using 18v tools more regularly than a 36v tool. (unless of course the 36v is your tool of need all the time)
Also as the AH of 18v batteries increase so would the runtime of the 36v machine when used with 2 x 18v batteries.
By Bosch reducing the types of batteries and still being able to deliver a powerful machine when needed it would save them money in the production costs of batteries.
Also the 36v batteries at present have less AH and so runtime, yet the cost for one battery is around the same as 2 x18v batteries.
I think this is the way to go rather than tying yourself to a tool with a fanny pack. IMHO

 

This post was edited by Kirk Strandberg on 23.06.2014, 13:38 o’clock
Reason: Creating a flexible power source to drive more powerful tools

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Electrical installation
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Makita have long bee innovators in cordless tools.  For example they were first to adopt Li ion tech to their professional grade cordless range.

Early adoption is, however, a double edged sword.  Within Makita's battery platform lies a fatal flaw:  premature cell demise.  Many of my colleagues have suffered premature battery failure.  It seems to be a product of Makita's first generation Lithium cells, the rapidness of charging (22 mins) or both.  Makita's batteries are allowed to exhaustively discharge; fatal for lithium cells. 

Newer tool designs, such as their grinder, compensate for this discharge risk by offering overload  and deep discharge protection within the tool, unfortunately rendering the tool utterly useless for anything other than the very lightest work!  It is one of the most frustrating tool I've ever used!

Bosch & Samsung, while not exactly innovative in battery technology nevertheless has a far superior, stable and secure battery platform than many of their competitors.