Bosch has lost it's awesomness
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I mean.. come on you guys? Where is the innovation we can see from Milwaukee? Where is that brushless power that we can get from... Makita?? Where is the power we can get from Dewalt? What does Bosch Power Tools (PRO) brand name stand for these days? Yes, the 36V Bulldog is awesome... but that's about it. We want more!
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My local tool repairer has literally boxes of failed Milwaukee brushless motors.  Seriously.  The entire motor requires swapping out each time it fails.  That's just warranty repairs.  Milwaukee certainly are innovative in developing new tools, but fail miserably in comparison to the quality, reliability and longevity of the older AEG products they replaced.

Bosch probably spend more on R&D than just about anybody else, in real terms (actual spend) and relative (as a % of turnover).  Maybe that's why the sell less "dogs" than many other manufacturers.  The more development, the less chance of failure.

Not every tool a company makes can be a success.  I've seen terrible tools from all well respected manufacturers.  Some manufacturers have particular specialties in which they tend to excel.  For Bosch its jigsaws & SDS Hammers, for Metabo its drills & grinders, for Festo its sanders & loose tenon jointers, for DeWalt its their routers, and for Makita (most of) their cordless range.  Yet not every product within these "specialty" ranges is immune from faults either.  I can name (but won't) a particular tool in each and every one of the abovementioned classes that isn't up to snuff.

As for Milwaukee, well I've personally yet to find any particular meritorious of truly innovative product within their range.  Milwaukee tools these days are seemingly more price than quality driven.
 
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And i just buy bosch :(
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I am not that interested in "innovative" line ups anymore.
I want a complete and reliable line up in a tool brand.  It is no use buying in to a system that is innovative but not complete. It is no use buying in to a system that is not reliable.

Smart batteries? Brushless? Doesn't help if they haven't got the tool you need.
I would take ergonomics and reliability over highest NM/rpm/Ah in a drill. 

The newer Milwaukee FUEL 18V line hammer drills surprised me. They are very very heavy and I can't see myself working with such heavy battery operated tools day in and out. No way.
 
Even Festool has QC issues, I have had far too many dealings with them lately - much more than I expected when I bought in to the system and today I don't really trust their new products - too much "innovation" and too little durability. Too much electronics and too sensitive for professional use. And I take care of my tools. 

I think that Bosch is in the better end of the scale for QC.
But, Bosch suffers from having a little less ergonomics in their current battery drill line - the GSR series is perhaps the only new and current line up that has seen the drills/drivers go from a very good grip, to a decent grip and now to a very poor grip - less rubber, fatter and wider at the base forcing the fingers out when holding the drill at an angle and uncomfortable in normal operation. With gloves on it is a disaster for medium to small hands. Without gloves it is very bad.

Pick up a Milwaukee, Hitachi, Flex, Makita, DeWalt, Festool T-series (C-series are not to everyones taste...) or virtually any other brand and the grip is great to excellent. Compare them to the current and newly released Bosch GSR series and you will find that Bosch loses out on the grips. Big time.

Sadly the new grip style is carried over to the 10,8V machines putting Bosch at the bottom together with Metabo for poor grip ergonomics on the smaller machines. (Same mold?)

I have had a minor crusade against Bosch grip ergonomics the last two months, mainly because I am invested in the 18V line up but also because I appreciate Bosch products and just wish they would rework the ergonomics. There is hardly anyone I heard of in the woodworking community that really like the new GSR grip style.  It really is that bad. I opened up my new brush-less machine to see why it was so wide and found that there were plenty of room for the electronics and wiring and that tells me it is not a question of fitting electronics and wiring - it is a question of poor ergonomics.

This is surprising since the Bosch GDX V-EC Impact has (in my opinion) one of the best grips on the market - with or without gloves. It seems Bosch designers think that high torque drills have to have wide base and fat grips with little to no rubber but that is a ergonomic mistake and they won't sell drills on ergonomics - perhaps they will sell them on reputation but they are going backwards in my book.  The Bosch hammer drills still have great ergonomics though. The hammer drill legacy is strong.

For that reason I must concur with the poster - Bosch has lost some of its awesomeness.

But - there are still gems in the line up, the Hammer drills, the Jigsaw and lots of other tools that are excellent value for money as well as being precision oriented and durable. The problem is that you can't trust Bosch to deliver on their new products - you really have to go to a retailer and try it out in hand - if you buy them on reputation alone you might be disappointed. They are not alone in this but since they are not clearly better than other brands it is really hard to say Bosch is awesome as a whole.
 

This post was edited by kosmoskatten on 20.06.2015, 21:07 o’clock
Reason: grammar