GTS10J
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Sector experience since
1986
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Other building trade
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I have just bought the Bosch GTS10J table saw, having originally gone out to buy a Makita MLT100.

Comparing the two machines in the store, I felt that the Bosch was just a much better quality tool, especially with the really nice dual clamping square section rip guide/fence. The fence clamps really tight to give a nice, solid guide when feeding wood through the saw, whereas I could imagine pieces wobbling all over the place with the guides on some other saws where they clamp only at one end.

Another nice thing is the way all the parts can be stored onboard the saw, with little storage places integrated under the table, ideal for when transporting the saw.  There is also storage for the push stick, a spanner for changing blades, and a couple of Allen keys. The side extension table also has a nice feel to it, sliding smoothly, with a nice, clear measuring guide integrated.

The motor has been powerful enough to tackle the boards that I've tried so far (18mm timber board and solid wood flooring) and has a soft start, unlike many of the cheaper saws. That said, it is quite loud, so ear defenders would be a good idea. Also, even with dust extraction running, there still seems to be a lot of fine dust in the air, so again think about PPE.

The quality of the table is also very nice, being smooth and flat. Height adjustment of the blade is easy, as is the angle tilt adjustment, although, this can feel a little slack, as there are no gear teeth involved when changing the tilt.

The flap covering the power switches is a nice idea and handy for turning the machine off without fumbling for a small switch.

The saw is also easy to move and has plenty of places to grip when carrying. It also has bumpers on the bottom corners adding extra protection against knocks.

I would have liked to have seen a better mitre guide, something more like the one found on the GTS10XC, with the sliding table would have been really nice, as something similar is found on the Makita. The guide on the GTS 10 J, I find, tends to wobble in the T slot/guide, which can affect the accuracy of the cuts.

Overall, I'm very pleased with how it has performed and now wish that I had bought its bigger brother, the GTS10XC, as I think it's going to be a tool I use for a lot more than originally planned! If only there was a way to pay the difference in price and swap!

edit: I have noticed that sometimes the guide fence doesn't align square to the blade and so find that  on important cuts I'm having to check the blade to fence distance before start to cut. I'm also starting to feel a bit concerned about the plastic handle on the fence, for locking and unlocking, as it feels a bit flimsy when making sure the fence is locked tight.
Activity
Sector experience since
1986
Sector
Other building trade
Written on
A friend has just chopped their fingers off on a table saw! Just reminds us all, be careful out there!

This post was edited by ChrisEdu on 17.04.2012, 14:55 o’clock
Reason: typo

Deleted user
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The fence slots are not a standard size so other mitre gauges and accessories won't fit as purchased - bummer. 
How about bosch produce a better mitre gauge?
Deleted user
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I think the GTS10 JPro saw is a fine tool in many respects but has a fundemental design flaw that in my mind means it should not be purchased. It is not possible to cut grooves in any meterial because the riving blade obstructs the saw blade. After following the manual instructuons to lower the riving blade it always stands higher than the saw blade and therfore will obstruct every cut, so the product as sold is not fit for purpose. 
 
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Other woodworking
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can anyone confirm if the riving knife can be set lower than the blade for non-through cuts etc.? The comment above suggests not but i'm sure i've seen in the write ups saying it can?
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Joinery installation in the broadest sense
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Hello smithbit.
The GTS10J can indeed be used for non-through cuts/trenching/dado (via multiple passes, not via dado stack).
When the riving knife is pushed to it's full back position (always relatie to blade height), the top falls around a mm short of the tip of the blade. In other words, with the knife back, you can run a board over it for a non through cut.
This is dependent on a couple of important points however. Firstly, that if you upgrade or replace your blade, to use the riving knife in non-through cuts, the blade must be the right (read maximum) size - in this case 254mm/10". Many blades are sold as 10" but are in fact 250mm. This is actually 9.84" and would mean you risk your riving knife lifting your work of the blade in a non-through cut. I see exbury above has a non-standard blade in their pic. They may have made this size error.
The second point is an often overlooked one and that is dust build-up. Where the riving knife is attached to the saw body, the slot can accumulate fine dust. This can stop the riving knife being extended or retracted to it's extremes, therefore causing problems with regards non-through cuts. Be good to your tools - give them a service from time to time.
Lastly I'd say that a riving knife isn't necessary for non-through cuts. A riving knifes primary purpose is to keep the through cut pieces seperated, minimising kickback etc. If you're trenching, as you're not seperating pieces of the board, you can simply remove the riving knife (do remember to put it back for your through cuts!). With this in mind, if you've bought a smaller diameter speciality blade or, a 250mm rather than a proper 10", 254mm blade, you can still use it for your non-thru/trenching cuts. You've just got the extra faff of removing the riving knife.
Hope this is helpful.
 
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Thanks bailey, thats answered perfectly! Wouldn't of occurred to me thinking about the 10" vs 250mm blades, especially as I didn't know how far down below the knife could sit.

Honestly, that answer is really helpful cheers