GCM 12 GDL sliding arm misalignment
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Hello All,
I have a problem with my mitre saw gliding arm. Imagine a vertical plane on the space that sliding arm travels and the saw blade is not parallel to that plane. thus, there is no way to adjust the mitre saw precisely. I clamped a square gauge to the fence ( square is checked) and aligned saw blade mitre angle  according to as described on the users manual. Than, when I pull the sliding arm, it makes an angle with the square gauge. In case I re-align it to the square, than it tries to run over the suare gauge when I push it back. the only way saw blade travels parallel to the square gauge is it should make an angle ( approximatelly 1,5°) with the square gauge. Could anyone help me with this error??? Any way to calibrate saw blade hub o slide arm movement??
Thanks
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Hello meseligunler.
Sorry for not replying earlier, I missed this one.
From the pictures you supplied (thanks for doing that) this is a relatively simple set-up fix. It's not the arm/blade you need to adjust but the fence.
Take off the sliding top parts of the fence and loosen the bolts securing the bottom part of the fence. There should now be some play in the fence. Put your square against the fence and move the blade along it's travel. Adjust so it's square at full extension and full back position. Once you're happy, tighten the fence back up (double checking as you go). This should sort it for you.
OK, found a video of a guy doing exactly this adjustment. It's on the older model with the rails, not the radial arm but the same process applies. He also shows you how to set the 0-degree bevel too, should you need to.
Hope this helps.
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As a follow up having looked at a collegues GCM 12 GDL, I've noticed the fence bolts are not mounted on top of the bottom part of the fence like on my old GCM 12, but at the back. This limits fence adjustment using this method.
The GCM 12 GDL though can be adjusted for true (0/90 degree mitre) by loosening the philips head screws (x4 I think) on the mitre guage on the saw base. Have the saw head in the 0 degree detent before loosening the screws. Have your square sat against the fence and adjust the saw head/base guage until square. Check it for square at full extension as well as full back, when true, retighten the screws on the mitre guage. You might have to reset the red mitre marker back to 0 degree position if you've made an adjustment. Just loosen the allen bolt, set to 0, retighten. Job done. We did this this morning so should work for you too.
I won't delete the previous comment as it still might be usefull for others who have the older GCM 12.
I would have liked to be able to edit my original reply though - Still unable to do this Bob. The "edit" option is there in the drop down menu but it doesn't do anything. Any idea why?
 
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Hello Bailey, 
Thanks for your reply.
Those 4 allen head screws I made the angle adjustment between the blade and the fence. As you mentioned, the screws on the fence are just for assembly purpose. 
The thing is, when the blade is square to the fence when the sliding arm is pushed back position, keeping the square gauge at the same position, it is not square to the blade when the sliding arm is pulled back:( there is a lateral movement of the blade. When I set it again as the pulled back position is reference, than it hits the square gauge. 
I recorded a video right now, below you may find the link.
https://youtu.be/Q1wmeTsqUgA

Unfortunatelly, I could not find any way to set the blade square to the fence when sliding arm is activated. There are two options for this error, sliding arms vertical travel plane ( plane that arm is moving on) is not parallel to the blade, or there is a lateral movement on the sliding arm to the right when pulled forward.
p.s. I have no idea why you cannot edit your previous comment:)

 
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Hello meseligunler
Thanks for the video. It's a little hard to tell but in the vid, the adjustment you make is with the mitre guage screws removed yes? (It looks like it with the screw holes being so dark but if you're making the adjustment without the screws removed, it's no surprise the misalignment returns)
If so, try again, with your square in place and the saw blade full back. Loosen and remove the mitre guage scews, pull the saw blade to full extension, make your adjustment, then pop in one or two screws to hold your adjustment in place. Now check again for true along the blade travel.
Let us know how you get on.
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Hello Bailey,
I just loosen the screw ( few full turns) but Id idn't remove. The table hardly rotates after I loosen them all. Than I adjust the square ( counting the kerf of the blade, locate the square gauge  between teeth of the blade).Than tighten them, pull the sliding arm and there is a gap between the square and the blade. If I adjust the table when the sliding arm is completely pulled, than it is misaligned when I push it back. There is no unique angle that all sliding arm positions are square. If there is a fault in the sliding arm, it must be blocked during the operation, thus I think there is a sligt deviation, angular error, between the sliding arm travel plane and the blade. 
There is only one adjustment with the sliding arm, ardness of the travel.
There is no adjustment with the blade hub:(
What do you suggest at this point?
Thanks and sorry for late reply.
Have a nice day.
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This post has been deleted by bailey on 18.07.2017, 12:54 o’clock
Reason: Re-think

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Just deleted a reply as I had a re-think.
I just want to make sure having watched your video again; in the video, it didn't appear as though you adjusted the actual table when you extended the blade but, you adjusted the square. Hence, when pushed back, the blade hit the square and when pulled forward again, the gap was present at full extension. The square needs to remain in place, it's the table that needs to be rotated to meet the square. Once you've put the square in place, you shouldn't move it when adjusting if possible.

You can see in the video you supplied how out of square the table is. When your square is against the fence, you can clearly see the edge running out of true along the table extension. If you freeze the video at 0:21 you can see the silver coloured table top, contrasted to the blue sides, creating a wedge shape against your square. So, I recomend trying again.
To avoid a seesaw affect, perhaps have the blade down and half way along it's travel, then set your square against the fence. Loosen and remove the screws on the mitre guage, then pull the blade to full extension. Without moving the square, adjust the table/blade to meet the square. Replace the screws and retighten, then push the blade back checking for square.

You might also try roughing it to begin with. By that I mean, with the square set against the fence, have the edge toward the blade a couple of mm away from the blade itself when blade is at full back position. Loosen and remove the mitre guage screws and make your adjustment. You want to look at the mitre table extension, looking to see that it's starting to look true against your square. When you think it looks about right, measure the distance between the blade and your square edge (don't move the square!). It should be coming out at roughly the same along the blade travel. If you're measurements show there's still a little more adjustment to make, do so. Retighten the screws, then check the run with your square against the blade.

If none of the above seem to be working for you and you're worried there might be some misalignment in the radial arm, bring the blade in it's down position to half way along it's travel. Set a straight edge flush against the blade (avoiding the blade teeth) but make sure it is not touching the fence - you just want it flush to the blade. If possible, try and secure your straight edge with clamps or some such. You can steady it with your fingers but just be mindful of any movement - and again remember, you don't want it touching the fence - you're not checking for square against the fence but for true in the arm. Run the blade along it's travel. It should run pretty much flush against your straight edge. If it is, there's nothing wrong with the radial arm and you'll need to go back to trying to adjust the rotating base to align it to your fence.
If it doesn't run near as damn it flush against your straight edge when not set to the fence, then there could be a problem with the arm. If possible, if and when you try this, could you make another short video so we can see? It really helps.

Good luck meseligunler and let us know how you get on.
All the best.



 
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I'm having the same exact problem. Followed the owners manual to the T when squaring the base to the fence. With square in same place, there is a gap on full extension of the radial arm. I will follow this post in hopes someone comes up with a good solution to an annoying problem.
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I think I may be having the same problem--and I don't think it's possible to fix it with fence or base adjustments. In my case, I found that sliding cuts produced straight cuts, but chop cuts are off by about 1/32" over 6". The problem is the blade is not square, but the sliding action is. Basically, the blade is "crabbing" when sliding. This produces a square cut when sliding, although with a slightly wider cut due to the crabbing. It's the same thing as watching a car drive down the road with it's rear axle out of alignment.  The car is going straight down the road, but the car is pointed at a slight angle--otherwise known as crabbing.

My saw is doing the same thing. The adjustment needed doesn't appear to exist. The motor and blade assembly needs to rotate slightly so that the blade is in alignment with the sliding plane. Make sense? I'm very distraught as I ruined a good piece trying to square up the crooked end while locked in chop mode. Stupidly, I kept nibbling at the cut thinking if I shave a little more off it would straighten out. After I had shortened it 1/4" (ruining it), I took some scrap stock and started investigating. This is when I found that chop cuts were out of square, but sliding cuts were fine. I then confirmed this with a carpenter square (which I should have pulled out much earlier). Sure enough, the blade was not square with the fence. So I adjusted the table and squared up the blade--but guess what? Now the sliding cuts were out of square! It doesn't matter if I try adjusting the table or the fence--neither of those change the relationship between the blade angle and the sliding plane. The blade must be aligned with the sliding action. But it appears the motor mount assembly is molded to the arm with no visible adjustments. Any suggestions?